20th October 2014

Photo reblogged from A Black Recluse with 76,806 notes

queen-mzbigabootie:

haneefistheonlyone:

kwamejaw:

Im pretty sure I walk past a lot more cops than that

queen-mzbigabootie:

haneefistheonlyone:

kwamejaw:

Im pretty sure I walk past a lot more cops than that

image

Source: neonarizona

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Rhythm Divine with 37,751 notes

fullten:

Cornell West has degrees from Harvard, and Princeton. Taught at Harvard and the University of Paris, and was in the fucking Matrix… 
This never was about clothing, attitude, stature, or economic status, this is about black vs white. This is what the fuck racism is.

fullten:

Cornell West has degrees from Harvard, and Princeton. Taught at Harvard and the University of Paris, and was in the fucking Matrix… 

This never was about clothing, attitude, stature, or economic status, this is about black vs white. This is what the fuck racism is.

Source: theladyinthestripeddress

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from abstrack africana with 249 notes

fyeahafrica:

Things Fall Apart is a 1958 novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first African novels written in English to receive global critical acclaim. The title of the novel comes from William Butler Yeats’s poem “The Second Coming”. 
The novel depicts the life of Okonkwo, a leader and local wrestling champion in Umuofia—one of a fictional group of nine villages in Nigeria, inhabited by the Igbo ethnic group. In addition it focuses on his three wives, his children, and the influences of British colonialism and Christian missionaries on his traditional Igbo community during the late nineteenth century.
Things Fall Apart was followed by a sequel, No Longer at Ease (1960), originally written as the second part of a larger work together with Things Fall Apart, and Arrow of God (1964), on a similar subject. Achebe states that his two later novels, A Man of the People (1966) and Anthills of the Savannah (1987), while not featuring Okonkwo’s descendants and set in fictional African countries, are spiritual successors to the previous novels in chronicling African history.

fyeahafrica:

Things Fall Apart is a 1958 novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first African novels written in English to receive global critical acclaim. The title of the novel comes from William Butler Yeats’s poem “The Second Coming”. 

The novel depicts the life of Okonkwo, a leader and local wrestling champion in Umuofia—one of a fictional group of nine villages in Nigeria, inhabited by the Igbo ethnic group. In addition it focuses on his three wives, his children, and the influences of British colonialism and Christian missionaries on his traditional Igbo community during the late nineteenth century.

Things Fall Apart was followed by a sequel, No Longer at Ease (1960), originally written as the second part of a larger work together with Things Fall Apart, and Arrow of God (1964), on a similar subject. Achebe states that his two later novels, A Man of the People (1966) and Anthills of the Savannah (1987), while not featuring Okonkwo’s descendants and set in fictional African countries, are spiritual successors to the previous novels in chronicling African history.

Source:

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from The Un-Written Story with 11,610 notes

missoreolegit:

Piercings.

missoreolegit:

Piercings.

Source: bciacco

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from AmazeLife with 8,339 notes

philmarc:

First illustration of the year, wanted to portray the over militarization of the police force in regards to Ferguson and other recent events

philmarc:

First illustration of the year, wanted to portray the over militarization of the police force in regards to Ferguson and other recent events

Source: philmarc

18th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from Wakandan Furyan with 71,280 notes

Source: justice4mikebrown

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Wakandan Furyan with 6,383 notes

ancestralvoices:

The concept of sticking pins in a doll used to inflict pain on others is not traditional in the practice of Haitian Vodun. Dolls/figurines have been used as symbolic icons on shrines or in rituals to represent the Loa/Lwa (Divine forces of nature). 










Voodoo dolls are now commonly found in New Orleans, Louisiana; this is due to the mix of spiritual practices including Vodun, Hoodoo and European magical practices.Some Western African practices use figures with and nails and pins in them they are known as nkisi. However instead of being used to inflict pain they are essentially a container of spiritual forces that are used for healing purposes. The concept of revenge dolls can be traced back to medieval European folk magic with use of poppets, effigies of specific people, which were used to place curses. The poppets however were also used for positive purposes such as healing and bringing good luck.NOTE INCLUDING VISUALShttps://www.facebook.com/notes/ancestral-voices-esoteric-african-knowledge/did-you-know/433913709971094?ref=notif&notif_t=like

ancestralvoices:

The concept of sticking pins in a doll used to inflict pain on others is not traditional in the practice of Haitian Vodun. Dolls/figurines have been used as symbolic icons on shrines or in rituals to represent the Loa/Lwa (Divine forces of nature). 


Voodoo dolls are now commonly found in New Orleans, Louisiana; this is due to the mix of spiritual practices including Vodun, Hoodoo and European magical practices.

Some Western African practices use figures with and nails and pins in them they are known as nkisi. However instead of being used to inflict pain they are essentially a container of spiritual forces that are used for healing purposes. 

The concept of revenge dolls can be traced back to medieval European folk magic with use of poppets, effigies of specific people, which were used to place curses. The poppets however were also used for positive purposes such as healing and bringing good luck.

NOTE INCLUDING VISUALS
https://www.facebook.com/
notes/ancestral-voices-esoteric-african-knowledge/did-you-know/433913709971094?ref=notif&notif_t=like

Source: facebook.com

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Diaspora Dash with 68 notes

negrodocumentary:

NEGRO: A documentary about Latino Identity Screening + Panel Discussion on AfroLatinas and beauty image and mental health with the producer Dash Harris, Carolina Contreras of Miss Rizos.com
Sunday, October 26th 
2pm-4pm 
La Casa Azul Bookstore
103rd St. and Lexington

$10 suggested donation
RSVP to lacasaazulbookstore@gmail.com 

Please consider bringing a brown doll for the newly launched AfroLatino Travel’s “Brown Dolls for Brown Children - Panama” Campaign. 

negrodocumentary:

NEGRO: A documentary about Latino Identity Screening + Panel Discussion on AfroLatinas and beauty image and mental health with the producer Dash Harris, Carolina Contreras of Miss Rizos.com

Sunday, October 26th
2pm-4pm 
La Casa Azul Bookstore
103rd St. and Lexington
$10 suggested donation
RSVP to lacasaazulbookstore@gmail.com 
Please consider bringing a brown doll for the newly launched AfroLatino Travel’s “Brown Dolls for Brown Children - Panama” Campaign. 

Source: negrodocumentary

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Ruined Childhood with 27,613 notes

17th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from A Black Recluse with 12,795 notes

the-goddamazon:

That is the face of someone who does not want you to see “Exodus” because you fucking know better.

Source: asieybarbie